Sustainable Brand: Thinking Mu

Last summer during my stay in Mallorca I discovered the sustainable Spanish brand Thinking Mu. They sell clothes and accessories for man and woman. For their pieces, they use natural organic fabrics like hemp, cotton, merino wool, cashmere, banana fibers (made from banana leaves) and chrome-free leather. They also use recycled polyester from plastic bottles. By this, the brand helps to keep the oceans clean and the marine life to thrive.

Most of Thinking Mu pieces are ethically made in India. They have a long-term relationship with the same garment workers, ensure fair labor practices and offer safe working conditions. The knit collection is produced by a team in Barcelona at a factory that is specialized in knit and it is one of the leaders in the Spanish business.

Not only Thinking Mu make their products in an ethical way with sustainable materials, but they also make them look fun with unique prints and embroidery.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the ‘Jersey Las Vegans Flock’. The pictures were made by Marisa Elisa Photography.

Algodon Organico Thinking MuThinking mu sustainable fashion

There’s not a single Thinking MU product which isn’t socially and economically fair and environmentally responsible.

Thinking Mu algodon organico

Every fabric has a story about sustainability and fair-trade to tell.

Thinking Mu

What I´m wearing:
Jersey // Thinking Mu (organic cotton – fair-trade)
Pants // Second-hand from a charity shop
Shoes // Second-hand from a swap party
Bag // Denise Roobol

With Love,
Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Halla Halla

Summertime. Who doesn’t love it? The perfect time to go to the beach, relax and sunbath. For this, I was looking for a sustainable swimsuit, and I discovered the Finnish swimwear brand Halla Halla. For their pieces, they use a fabric made from recycled plastic bottles and fishing nets found in the oceans. By this, Halla Halla helps to keep the oceans clean and the marine life to thrive.

All of Halla Halla swimsuit pieces are ethically made in Bali. They keep the production low and only produce a limited quantity at a time. Not only they make their products in an ethical way with sustainable materials, they make them look fun with unique prints and vibrant colors. All of the swimwear is reversible, with on one side a solid color, and on the other side a print. This way you get two looks in one.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the ‘Coco One Piece Ava’ swimsuit. From one side it has a seashell black and white print and on the other side, it is blue. The pictures were made on Mallorca, Spain.

Recycled Swimwear

‘Let’s look fabulous and feel amazing, while we keep the oceans clean.’ #hallaxhalla

 

 

Econyl Beachwear

 

 

What I´m wearing:
Shirt // Second-hand made from organic cotton
Skirt // Second-hand from a charity shop
Bandana // Vintage shop
Swimsuit // Halla Halla

With Love,
Alisson

Check more sustainable swimwear brands here.

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7 Beachwear Brands That Use Recycled Materials

Summer is just around the corner. It’s time to go to the beach, relax and sunbath. And of course, it’s time to show off your summer body. Whether you prefer a bikini or a swimsuit, let’s try to make this coming season a green one. How? By investing in sustainable swimwear brands.

I discovered some brands that use recycled polyester, organic cotton, lyocell and the latest trend: Econyl (made from recycled fishing nets). While all of the following swimwear brands still use nylon and polyester, these fibers are recycled from ghost fishing nets and plastic bottles. By recycling, we are not increasing the demand for new plastic and are helping to give new life to what otherwise would have end up in the trash.

Today I listed out my favorite beachwear brands for you:

1. Underprotection

Sustainable bikini underprotection
Picture from Underprotection’s website

Underprotection is a Danish brand based in Copenhagen. They make sustainable lingerie, loungewear, and swimwear. They only use organic cotton, recycled polyester, recycled wool, milk, and lyocell in their collection. Oh, and they only have two collections per year and care about a fair production.

2. Baiia

 

 

Baiia is an Australian swimwear brand. The pieces are made from industrial and post-consumer waste such as fishnets, carpets, plastic bottles, and textiles. The recycled fabrics are certified with the 100 by Oeko-Tex standard; the world’s leader in testing fabrics to regulate harmful substances. Their pieces are reversible making it a perfect piece for a minimalistic wardrobe.

3. Pura

 

 

Pura is a Swiss brand of swimwear. The name means pure, which refers to pure fabrics and a pure conscience. All the bikinis are handmade in Switzerland, using recycled fabrics or fabric that is certified with the OEKO STANDARD 100 which means that the fabric is tested for harmful substances and sustainability. Pura’s swimwear pieces are a limited edition, this way they avoid an overproduction.

4. Lemon Spicy

Lemon spicy sustainable swimwear
Picture from Lemon Spicy’s website

Lemon Spicy is an Australian swimwear brand. The pieces are made from 78% Econyl and 22% lycra. This mix makes the pieces more chlorine resistant than the average swimwear fabric. It also has UV protection and is sunscreen resistant.

5. Morena Jambo

 

 

Morena Jambo is a Portuguese brand with 10 years in the market. Their objective is to promote sustainability in fashion, from an ethical production. Their garments are made from 100% Econyl and their biggest inspiration is the nature.

6. Coco Frio

cocofriocollection
Picture from Coco Frio’s website

Coco Frio is a French brand based in Paris. Fashion, ethics, and eco-responsibility it’s at the core of this brand. All of their garments are ethically made in Italy. Using the fabric Econyl.

7. Anekdot boutique

Anekdot suit
Photography by Lauren See and Colette Pomerleau http://www.colettepomerleau.com

Anekdot is an upcycling brand based in Germany. They produce their collections with fabrics that are left behind in the fashion industry. They also use Econyl which is also made from post-consumer waste. The elastics of their garments were bought in London from a closing down factory in the UK.

I hope you get inspired and liked my list. I’m I missing any brand? Let me know in the comments below.

With Love,

Alisson

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