Sustainable Dress From Jan ‘n June

The season of wearing summer dresses is almost over. Before the autumn starts, I want to show you one of my favorite dresses from the sustainable brand ‘Jan ‘n June’. If you still don’t know this German label, read all about it here on an older blog post.

On this series of pictures, I am wearing the ‘Midi Slip Dress Capri Lemon’ on size S. The dress has a relaxed fit, midi length, and a low-cut back. The dress has a lining so it’s not see-through. The pictures were taken by the photographer Yenis Vega.

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Check the new collection of Jan ‘n June for some sustainable autumn inspiration. Let me know which item is your favorite. Mine is definitely the pink dress.

With Love,
Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Organic Basics

On my search for eco-friendly basic clothing, I found the Danish brand Organic Basics. The brand is based in Copenhagen and it has been active since 2015. Sustainability and ethical practices are at the core of the brand.

All of the clothes from Organic Basics are made from sustainable fabrics. The most commonly used fabric is organic cotton. The cotton is grown in Turkey without the use of pesticides, no toxic substances, no chemical fertilizer, and no bad chemicals. It is grown without genetically modified seeds, and it is GOTS certified (which means that apart from being certified organic, it is grown by humans that are treated like humans).

Besides organic cotton, they also use an innovative fabric called SilverTech. The fiber has real silver in it. Silver has historically been used as an antimicrobial. And it is also thermodynamic, which means that the fabric keeps you cool in the summer, and warm in the winter.  The purpose of using silver is to prevent the need for frequent washing. Wearing more and washing less is better for clothes and for the environment.

Another fabric that Organic Basics use is recycled nylon. Mechanically recycled nylon is a fiber developed from post-industrial waste, yarns from spinning factories, and waste from weaving mills. Recycled nylon uses 80% less and creates 90% fewer CO2 emissions compared to regular nylon.

Ethical labors are very important for Organic Basics. They only work with factories that have fair wages and treat employees with respect. The factories are located in Turkey. One in Izmir and the other one in Istanbul. In order to monitor the working conditions in Turkey, a small team from Organic Basics visit the cotton farms, and factories once every three months. While there, they also interact with the workers and spend time together.

Last week I place an order and it came by bike to my address.

The packaging is made from recycled materials.
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Wearing the white organic cotton women’s tee. Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography.

The collection of Organic Basics is timeless, basic and minimalistic. Check it out and use my code: ALISSONOBC2 to get €15 Discount at www.organicbasics.com

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Sustainable Brand: B.Young

Scrolling down the sustainable webshop http://www.watmooi.nl I found the Danish brand: b.young. B.young is not per se sustainable, but they are making a change and started a line called b.fair. The intention is that in the future all of the b.young items will be sustainable and ethically made. B.fair is all about responsible production, sustainable materials, minimizing waste and exploiting new opportunities to reduce any negative impact that the production might have. As well as fair and ethical working conditions. B.fair’s suppliers are carefully selected to ensure they share the same values on business ethics, rights, and fair working conditions. They continuously monitor the factories with regular visits and inspections, focused on improving the health and safety of the employees involved. For their pieces, they use organic and BCI cotton, lyocell, recycled wool, and recycled polyester. For the packaging, labels, hangtags, and bags they use recycled materials.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the b.fair black Fiorella blouse. The pictures were made in The Netherlands by Marisa Elisa Photography.

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What I´m wearing:
Blouse // b.fair via www.watmooi.nl (Use my code ‘Alisson’ to get 10% discount)
Pants jacket // Second-hand
Bag from vegan leather // Denise Roobol
Shoes // Ehtletic

Use my code ‘Alisson’ to get 10% discount on the whole collection of www.watmooi.nl

With Love,
Alisson

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Different Approaches To Sustainable Fashion Explained

Sustainable fashion can be defined as clothing, shoes, and accessories that are manufactured taking into account both environmental and socio-economic aspects.
This implies continuous work to improve all stages of the product’s lifecycle from design, raw material production, manufacturing, transport, storage, marketing, and final sale. To use, reuse, repair, remake and recycling of the product and its components.

Fair or Ethical Fashion is clothing that is made taking into account the wealth being of the garment workers. It covers a range of issues such as working conditions, exploitation, fair trade, fair wages, improvement of the worker’s quality of life, sustainable production, the environment, and animal welfare.

Slow fashion advocates the principle of producing fewer new items. And only produce items of good quality, in a clean environment, and fairness for both consumers and producers. Slow fashion also means, to stick with what you have for a long time. Some elements of the slow fashion philosophy include: buying vintage clothes, redesigning old clothes, shopping from smaller producers, making clothes and accessories at home and buying garments that last longer.

Vegan fashion is clothing and accessories made from cruelty-free sources. Where no animal products were used in making the garments and gear, and no animal was harmed. Vegan fashion doesn’t use any leather, wool, feathers, silk or fur. Instead, the clothes are made from fabrics such as cotton, linen or hemp. Manmade materials such as polyester, acrylic or nylon. And innovative materials like pinatex made from pineapple leaves or mycoworks made from mushroom skin.

Organic fashion is clothing made from materials grown in compliance with organic agricultural standards. The production ensures that there is no use of pesticides in the growing process. Organic fashion takes care of the health and land of the farmers.  Organic clothing may be composed of cotton, jute, silk, ramie, or wool.

Minimalist fashion is a lifestyle that implies to have as little as possible. Minimalists stick to a limited color palette. Mostly monochromatic. The wardrobe consists of low-key but timeless pieces that work every day, no matter what’s fashionable at the time. This promotes less consumption.

 

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Picture: Unsplash

 

I hope you understand now all about sustainable fashion. Is there anything you would like me to research and explain to you? Let me know in the comments below.

With Love,

Alisson

Sustainable Brand: Alchemist

Scrolling down the sustainable webshop http://www.watmooi.nl I found the Dutch brand: Alchemist. Alchemist is a high-end fashion brand that makes clothing from sustainable fabrics. The brand was founded by the Dutch designer Caroline Mewe. She is based on Amsterdam. For her collections, she combines influences from her childhood in nature with the inspiration she draws from the city.

Fair and sustainable fashion is at the core of the brand. For the brand, is important to know in which countries, by which people and under what conditions the clothes of Alchemist are been made. The team visits their producers at least once a year, to monitor the conditions on site. The producers have a certificate for social-ethical business practices. Alchemist has signed the International Sustainable Clothing and Textile Covenant and is a member of the Fair Wear Foundation. As a result, they are certain that the factories with which they work are controlled and that the workers work under good conditions.

Alchemist produces two collections per year, always paying close attention to the fact that the designs can easily be combined with earlier collections. Their quality requirements are high because what is well made will last a long time.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the pink voile ruffle blouse. The pictures were made in The Netherlands by Marisa Elisa Photography.

A Sustainable Mess

Alchemist Dutch Fashion Brand

“Alchemist believes that people are not isolated beings, but are connected to their environment.”

Dutch Fair Fashion Brand

What I´m wearing:
Blouse // Alchemist via www.watmooi.nl (Use my code ‘Alisson’ to get 10% discount)
Pants & vintage sunglasses // Second-hand from a charity shop
Bag // Denise Roobol
Shoes // Toms

Use my code ‘Alisson’ to get 10% discount on the whole collection of www.watmooi.nl

With Love,
Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Komodo

Strolling down the sustainable webshop www.watmooi.nl I discovered the English brand Komodo. Their goal is to design beautiful clothes and at the same time to bring fair jobs in developing countries. People who work hard to make our clothes deserve respect and fair wages. The founder of Komodo believes that it is a privilege to be able to dress stylishly. But it is the responsibility of today’s fashion designers to make that style fair and sustainable. For the garment workers and for the environment.

Komodo works according to the SA-8000 standards in the factories in Bali and Kathmandu (SA stands for Social Accountability). Because of this, you know for sure that the workers get a good salary, there is no child or forced labor, there is a safe and healthy working environment, there is a clear approach to the prevention of accidents at work, there are clean sanitary facilities and clean drinking water, there is a maximum on the number of working hours per week; no more than 48 hours and 12 hours of overtime. We might think this is obvious, but sadly enough it is not in a lot of third world country factories.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the Remia sweater made from Organic Cotton. The pictures were made in The Netherlands by Marisa Elisa Photography.

Sustainable fashion brandSustainable Fashion LondonKomodo Sustainable Fashion BrandSustainable Fashion NetherlandsSustainable Fashion Blog

What I´m wearing:
Sweater // Komodo via www.watmooi.nl
Pants, shoes, and jacket // Second-hand
Bag from vegan leather // Denise Roobol
Sunglasses // Dick Moby Amsterdam

With Love,
Alisson

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Learn About: Synthetic Fabrics

In the journey towards a more sustainable wardrobe, I came across the topic of fabrics. The production of garments whether from natural or synthetic fabrics cost a lot of resources. Natural fibers have a better impact on the environment than synthetic ones. But in order to know more about this topic, I will show you the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthetic fibers.

Polyester

is the most common synthetic fiber in the market. Chemical reactions are necessary in during the production of polyester and that involves coal, petroleum, air, and water.

Polyester:

  • Strong
  • Flexible
  • Dries quickly
  • Durable
  • Resists wrinkles
  • Doesn’t shrink
  • Inexpensive
  • Easy to wash

Disadvantages of polyester:

  • Not breathable
  • It builds up static
  • Can cause bad smell
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • The production requires a lot of energy
  • Causes an allergic reaction in some people
  • Microfibers come off during washing, which ends up polluting the oceans
  • It is difficult to dye, which requires a lot of toxic dyes and bleach in the production process

Polyester fabric

Acrylic

is made from a polymer. It is like polyester, a petrochemical fiber. The fabric is often used for sweaters, as linings for boots and gloves, as well as in furnishing fabrics and carpets. Some acrylic is used as a less expensive alternative to cashmere.

Acrylic is:

  • Soft
  • Lightweight
  • Warm – with a wool-like feel
  • Colourfast
  • Machine washable
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Inexpensive

The disadvantages of acrylic:

  • Painful to knit with
  • It is flammable
  • Pills easily
  • It builds up static
  • It doesn’t breath
  • Can cause bad smell
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • It’s hard or even impossible to recycle
  • The production requires toxic chemicals
  • Microfibers come off during washing, which ends up polluting the oceans

Research has found that acrylic is responsible for releasing nearly 730,000 tiny synthetic particles (microplastics) per wash. Five times more than polyester-cotton blend fabric, and nearly 1.5 times as many as polyester. ( “Accumulation of Microplastic on Shorelines Woldwide: Sources and Sinks”)

Green acrylic fabric

Nylon

is a petrochemical man-made fiber. It was developed in order to make a synthetic replacement for silk.

Nylon is:

  • Strong
  • Weather resistant
  • Versatile
  • Water repellent
  • Machine washable
  • Dries quickly
  • Durable
  • Inexpensive

The disadvantages of nylon are:

  • It builds up static
  • It can irritate the skin
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • The production requires toxic chemicals
  • Energy-intensive
  • Microfibers come off during washing, which ends up polluting the oceans

Nylon fabric

Spandex

is made from petrochemicals as well. It is also called Elastane or Lycra and it’s usually found blended with other fabrics.

Spandex is:

  • Elastic
  • Stretch
  • Retains its shape

The disadvantages of spandex are:

  • It breaks down over time
  • It becomes brittle
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • Energy-intensive
  • Polluting to make
  • The production requires toxic chemicals

Spandex

Rayon

is a fiber that is extracted or fabricated from wood pulp. Rayon is considered as a semisynthetic fiber.  It comes from wood but in order to make the fibers, it is combined with synthetic materials. Types of rayon include viscose, modal, and lyocell. Each of which differs in the manufacturing process.

Rayon is:

  • Versatile – It can imitate the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton, and linen
  • Easy to dye
  • Soft
  • Smooth
  • Comfortable
  • Highly absorbent
  • Cheap

The disadvantages of rayon are:

  • Bad quality
  • Pills easily
  • Wrinkles
  • Shrinks
  • Loses appearance and shape when wet
  • There are toxic dyes and bleach in the production process
  • Workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used in the production
  • Because it comes from trees, it might contribute to deforestation problems

Rayon fabric

As you can see, all of the fibers have advantages and disadvantages. I personally find synthetic fibers too harmful in general. I prefer to buy and wear garments from natural fibers as much as possible. This is a personal decision but whatever you choose, it’s good to know about the fabric of your garments. I hope you find this information useful and helps you to become more aware of synthetic fabrics. If you want to learn more about natural fibers, you can read my latest post about this subject here.

With Love,

Alisson

Learn more about Natural Fabrics
Learn more about cotton and polyester

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Cotton VS Polyester

We are surrounded by fabrics. The clothes we wear, the sheets we sleep with, the upholstery on our furniture, the rug we walk on. We can’t avoid them.

Before the invention of polyester in 1941, most used fabrics were of natural origin. Wool, cashmere, silk, linen, hemp, and cotton. If you start reading the fabric labels of today, you will most likely find synthetic materials like rayon, acrylic, acetate, nylon, and polyester. Synthetic fabrics are cheaper than natural ones. But the environment and our health are paying the real price of those cheap synthetic fabrics.

The most popular synthetic fabric is polyester. It is cheap and versatile. This is the main reason it has become so famous in the garment industry. Besides the price, polyester is popular because of its properties. It is wrinkle-free, long-lasting and dries quickly. High-quality polyester keeps in shape well and doesn’t shrink. However, due to the rise of fast fashion, nowadays most of the polyester clothes on the market are cheap and of bad quality.

Polyester is a petroleum-based fiber. Each year more than 70 billion barrels of oil are used to produce it. It is made from a synthetic, polymer known as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in the combination of harmful chemicals. This all sounds extremely scientific, but basically, polyester is a kind of plastic. Which means that it is not biodegradable and it adds to the microplastic water pollution problem. Every time a polyester garment is washed, it releases tiny particles that end in our oceans. When we wear synthetic fabrics, our body is in touch with all the harmful chemicals that are used in the production process. Also with the dyes. In case of polyester, the dyes are 100% chemical.

Most of the polyester yarns are produced in third world countries where environmental regulations are non-existent. Air and water pollution is often discharged untreated, harming the communities that surround the manufacturing plants. The production of polyester uses less water than the production of cotton, but polyester cannot be dyed using natural dyes. This means that the damage of water supplies is higher.

The most popular natural fabric is cotton. These are the main properties: Cotton is soft and breathable. It absorbs moisture to keep body temperature stable. Depending on the weave and finish, cotton can be also strong and rough as canvas. Cotton fibers are easy to dye with natural dyes and making it a good option for sensitive skin. As a completely natural material grown in fields, cotton is biodegradable. The fabric will break down over time. But in order to be environmentally friendly, the cotton must be grown organic thus without chemicals. Because once the fabric starts to biodegrade, the chemical parts of it are broken down as well. These substances end up in the ground and damage the land, plants, and animals. Organic cotton does not do that. The production of organic cotton is made without the use of pesticides, synthetic growth regulators and the seeds are not genetically modified.

After learning all those facts, it is clear to me that cotton has a more positive impact on the skin and on the environment than polyester. For the outfit of today, I teamed up again with Matter: a brand that makes responsible clothes from natural fabrics.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing ‘The lounge lunghi + Philippines teal’ pants from their new collection. The pants have a long fabric belt for an easy wrap around the waist.  These pants were printed in Jaipur and were stitched in Delhi. The material is a blend of 95% cotton and 5% linen. It was block-printed with azo-free dyes. The pictures were made in Amersfoort by photographer Marisa Elisa Photography.

Sustainable brandSustainable pantsMatter printsCotton and linnen pants

What I´m wearing:
Pants // Lunghi + Philippines teal from Matter (get it here)
Top // Second-hand from Second Lifestyle shop Amersfoort
Shoes // Ethletic
Bag 1 // From an artisan village in Colombia named Usiacuri
Bag 2 // Matt & Nat

Learn more about Matter and their sustainable and ethical production here.

With Love,

Alisson

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Learn More About Fast Fashion

Did you watched “The True Cost” and want to learn more about Fast Fashion? I have gathered seven videos for you to learn who is paying the real price of cheap clothes.
Here they are:

1. Fashion Factories Undercover – Real Stories


2. Sweatshop – Deadly Fashion


3. Made in Bangladesh – The fifth estate


4. Fast Fashion’s Effect on People, The Planet & You – Patrick Woodyard


5. How to Engage with Ethical Fashion – Clara Vuletich


6. Fashion: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver


7. The Wardrobe To Die For – Lucy Siegle

Do you feel motivated to start supporting ethical brands? Check my sustainable shopping guide and get inspired.

With Love,

Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Jan ‘n June

Yes! I found another fair and ethical fashion brand. This time I want to introduce you to Jan ‘n June. Jula and Anna started the eco-fashion label out of personal need for stylish, sustainable and affordable clothes. Back in 2013, fair fashion wasn’t easy to find.  After a summer night and a couple of wine glasses, they decided to start with one.

Transparency it´s at the core of Jann ‘n June. For Jula and Anna is very important to produce the clothes as responsible as possible with the environment and the garment workers. The clothes are produced in Wroclaw, Poland in a family-owned factory, where the girls keep an eye on the production. They visit the manufacturer on regular basis to define the workmanship for each article and auditing the factory. They only work with one partner in order to keep it simple and transparent. All the materials come from Turkey, Portugal or India and are GOTS or IVN Best certified. On every garment, you can read about the origin of it.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing the dress “Cannes Flow Black” from Jan ‘n June. The pictures were made in Amersfoort by the photographer Mitchel Lensink.
Check his work HERE.

Picture by Mitchel Lensink

 

 

 

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Picture by Mitchel Lensink

 

Picture by Mitchel Lensink

What I´m wearing:
Dress // Jan ‘n June (Get it here)
Bag // Matt & Nat (Get it here)
Boots // Second-lifestyle Amersfoort (second-hand shop)

With Love,
Alisson

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