Dresses To Wear As A Guest On A Wedding

Weddings are my favorite celebrations. It’s a good occasion to dress up, practice make-up skills and finally wear the high heels that are dusting in the closet. Since fair fashion has become more popular, the styles are changing and becoming something more than the typical hippy itchy hempy dress.

After checking out some of my favorite brands I listed out my favorite dresses for you. Let me know which one is your favorite.

Slip-on dress from Noumanon

Midi slip dress from Jan n June

Flower dress from Hide The Label

One sleeve ruffle dress from Mayamiko

Yellow dress from Rhuma
rhum_model_devine_jurk

Sustainable Brand: Halla Halla

Summertime. Who doesn’t love it? The perfect time to go to the beach, relax and sunbath. For this, I was looking for a sustainable swimsuit, and I discovered the Finnish swimwear brand Halla Halla. For their pieces, they use a fabric made from recycled plastic bottles and fishing nets found in the oceans. By this, Halla Halla helps to keep the oceans clean and the marine life to thrive.

All of Halla Halla swimsuit pieces are ethically made in Bali. They keep the production low and only produce a limited quantity at a time. Not only they make their products in an ethical way with sustainable materials, they make them look fun with unique prints and vibrant colors. All of the swimwear is reversible, with on one side a solid color, and on the other side a print. This way you get two looks in one.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the ‘Coco One Piece Ava’ swimsuit. From one side it has a seashell black and white print and on the other side, it is blue. The pictures were made on Mallorca, Spain.

Recycled Swimwear

‘Let’s look fabulous and feel amazing, while we keep the oceans clean.’ #hallaxhalla

 

 

Econyl Beachwear

 

 

What I´m wearing:
Shirt // Second-hand made from organic cotton
Skirt // Second-hand from a charity shop
Bandana // Vintage shop
Swimsuit // Halla Halla

With Love,
Alisson

Check more sustainable swimwear brands here.

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Cotton VS Polyester

We are surrounded by fabrics. The clothes we wear, the sheets we sleep with, the upholstery on our furniture, the rug we walk on. We can’t avoid them.

Before the invention of polyester in 1941, most used fabrics were of natural origin. Wool, cashmere, silk, linen, hemp, and cotton. If you start reading the fabric labels of today, you will most likely find synthetic materials like rayon, acrylic, acetate, nylon, and polyester. Synthetic fabrics are cheaper than natural ones. But the environment and our health are paying the real price of those cheap synthetic fabrics.

The most popular synthetic fabric is polyester. It is cheap and versatile. This is the main reason it has become so famous in the garment industry. Besides the price, polyester is popular because of its properties. It is wrinkle-free, long-lasting and dries quickly. High-quality polyester keeps in shape well and doesn’t shrink. However, due to the rise of fast fashion, nowadays most of the polyester clothes on the market are cheap and of bad quality.

Polyester is a petroleum-based fiber. Each year more than 70 billion barrels of oil are used to produce it. It is made from a synthetic, polymer known as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in the combination of harmful chemicals. This all sounds extremely scientific, but basically, polyester is a kind of plastic. Which means that it is not biodegradable and it adds to the microplastic water pollution problem. Every time a polyester garment is washed, it releases tiny particles that end in our oceans. When we wear synthetic fabrics, our body is in touch with all the harmful chemicals that are used in the production process. Also with the dyes. In case of polyester, the dyes are 100% chemical.

Most of the polyester yarns are produced in third world countries where environmental regulations are non-existent. Air and water pollution is often discharged untreated, harming the communities that surround the manufacturing plants. The production of polyester uses less water than the production of cotton, but polyester cannot be dyed using natural dyes. This means that the damage of water supplies is higher.

The most popular natural fabric is cotton. These are the main properties: Cotton is soft and breathable. It absorbs moisture to keep body temperature stable. Depending on the weave and finish, cotton can be also strong and rough as canvas. Cotton fibers are easy to dye with natural dyes and making it a good option for sensitive skin. As a completely natural material grown in fields, cotton is biodegradable. The fabric will break down over time. But in order to be environmentally friendly, the cotton must be grown organic thus without chemicals. Because once the fabric starts to biodegrade, the chemical parts of it are broken down as well. These substances end up in the ground and damage the land, plants, and animals. Organic cotton does not do that. The production of organic cotton is made without the use of pesticides, synthetic growth regulators and the seeds are not genetically modified.

After learning all those facts, it is clear to me that cotton has a more positive impact on the skin and on the environment than polyester. For the outfit of today, I teamed up again with Matter: a brand that makes responsible clothes from natural fabrics.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing ‘The lounge lunghi + Philippines teal’ pants from their new collection. The pants have a long fabric belt for an easy wrap around the waist.  These pants were printed in Jaipur and were stitched in Delhi. The material is a blend of 95% cotton and 5% linen. It was block-printed with azo-free dyes. The pictures were made in Amersfoort by photographer Marisa Elisa Photography.

Sustainable brandSustainable pantsMatter printsCotton and linnen pants

What I´m wearing:
Pants // Lunghi + Philippines teal from Matter (get it here)
Top // Second-hand from Second Lifestyle shop Amersfoort
Shoes // Ethletic
Bag 1 // From an artisan village in Colombia named Usiacuri
Bag 2 // Matt & Nat

Learn more about Matter and their sustainable and ethical production here.

With Love,

Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Po-Zu

Fast fashion doesn’t only affect the clothing industry, but the accessories and footwear industry as well. Mass-production eats up resources and sends an average of three pairs of shoes per person to landfill every year. The quest for cheaper and faster production has encouraged the exploitation of workers through long hours, low payments and dangerous working conditions.

Luckily, there are some ethical footwear brands that are busy changing this situation. One of them is called Po-Zu. To them, the worker’s rights are very important. The shoes are made in factories where they are committed to the highest standards of ethical manufacturing, they have a strict non-toxic policy, and they recycle nearly all their waste products, including fabric off-cuts and water.

The materials of their shoes come from naturally renewable sources and are responsibly harvested. They don’t contain pesticides, bleaches or toxic dyes and are locally sourced wherever possible.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the ‘low cut vegan lace-up’ shoes. They are made from organic cotton and fair trade rubber. The pictures were made in Amersfoort by photographer Marisa Elisa Photography.

Fair trade rubber shoesPo Zu shoesOrganic cotton canvas shoesEthically made shoes

What I´m wearing:
Shirt // Organic Basics Use this code to get 20% discount: OBxsimmonds20 Shop here
Leggings // Stronger
Jacket // Second-hand
Shoes // Po-Zu

With Love,
Alisson

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7 Beachwear Brands That Use Recycled Materials

Summer is just around the corner. It’s time to go to the beach, relax and sunbath. And of course, it’s time to show off your summer body. Whether you prefer a bikini or a swimsuit, let’s try to make this coming season a green one. How? By investing in sustainable swimwear brands.

I discovered some brands that use recycled polyester, organic cotton, lyocell and the latest trend: Econyl (made from recycled fishing nets). While all of the following swimwear brands still use nylon and polyester, these fibers are recycled from ghost fishing nets and plastic bottles. By recycling, we are not increasing the demand for new plastic and are helping to give new life to what otherwise would have end up in the trash.

Today I listed out my favorite beachwear brands for you:

1. Underprotection

Sustainable bikini underprotection
Picture from Underprotection’s website

Underprotection is a Danish brand based in Copenhagen. They make sustainable lingerie, loungewear, and swimwear. They only use organic cotton, recycled polyester, recycled wool, milk, and lyocell in their collection. Oh, and they only have two collections per year and care about a fair production.

2. Baiia

 

 

Baiia is an Australian swimwear brand. The pieces are made from industrial and post-consumer waste such as fishnets, carpets, plastic bottles, and textiles. The recycled fabrics are certified with the 100 by Oeko-Tex standard; the world’s leader in testing fabrics to regulate harmful substances. Their pieces are reversible making it a perfect piece for a minimalistic wardrobe.

3. Pura

 

 

Pura is a Swiss brand of swimwear. The name means pure, which refers to pure fabrics and a pure conscience. All the bikinis are handmade in Switzerland, using recycled fabrics or fabric that is certified with the OEKO STANDARD 100 which means that the fabric is tested for harmful substances and sustainability. Pura’s swimwear pieces are a limited edition, this way they avoid an overproduction.

4. Lemon Spicy

Lemon spicy sustainable swimwear
Picture from Lemon Spicy’s website

Lemon Spicy is an Australian swimwear brand. The pieces are made from 78% Econyl and 22% lycra. This mix makes the pieces more chlorine resistant than the average swimwear fabric. It also has UV protection and is sunscreen resistant.

5. Morena Jambo

 

 

Morena Jambo is a Portuguese brand with 10 years in the market. Their objective is to promote sustainability in fashion, from an ethical production. Their garments are made from 100% Econyl and their biggest inspiration is the nature.

6. Coco Frio

cocofriocollection
Picture from Coco Frio’s website

Coco Frio is a French brand based in Paris. Fashion, ethics, and eco-responsibility it’s at the core of this brand. All of their garments are ethically made in Italy. Using the fabric Econyl.

7. Anekdot boutique

Anekdot suit
Photography by Lauren See and Colette Pomerleau http://www.colettepomerleau.com

Anekdot is an upcycling brand based in Germany. They produce their collections with fabrics that are left behind in the fashion industry. They also use Econyl which is also made from post-consumer waste. The elastics of their garments were bought in London from a closing down factory in the UK.

I hope you get inspired and liked my list. I’m I missing any brand? Let me know in the comments below.

With Love,

Alisson

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Top 10 Organic Cotton T-shirts

Summer is just around the corner! Let’s try to make this coming season greener than it already is. How? By investing in organic and ethically made T-shirts. You might ask yourself why to invest in organic cotton? Here some facts:
– Organic cotton is grown without the use of insecticides, pesticides and chemical fertilizers.
– It protects the farmers, from being exposed to toxic chemicals.
– It eliminates the greenhouse gas emissions created through the production of chemical fertilizers.
– The soils remain healthy and sequester more carbon helping to mitigate climate change.
– Water consumption is reduced as well as the C02 emissions per tonne of cotton fiber.
Today I listed out my favorite sustainable T-shirt brands for you:

1. White T-shirt from Organic Basics

Organic cotton women's tee

Basic T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. Available in black or white.
Price €32,-
Use this code to get 20% discount: OBxsimmonds20
Shop here

2. Bisou on Stripes from Armedangels

Stripes t-shirt organic cotton Armedangels
Picture from armedangels’s website

Striped T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. Available in navy/white or red/white.
Price €39,90
Shop here

3. Ribbed T-shirt from Shop Saar

 

 

 

Made from a sturdy ribbed fabric of 95% organic cotton and 5% elastane. Available in petrol blue, pink, henna red and light blue. You can choose the kind of neck and sleeve you prefer.
Price €55,-
Shop here

4. Red heart T-shirt from Real Fake

Real fake organic tee
Picture from Geitenwollenwinkel’s website

White oversized T-shirt with a heart print at the heart height. Ethically made of 100% organic cotton. Available with a red or blue heart.
Price €45,-
Shop here

5. Basic T-shirt from Noumenon

 

 

 

Basic T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton.
Price €55,-
Shop here

6. Bonita T-shirt from Thinking MU

white organic tee
Picture from Sophie Stone’s website

The shirt has the text ‘Bonita’ embroidered above the left chest, which means ‘beautiful’. Made of 100% organic cotton.
Price €39,95
Shop here

7. Fake T-shirt from Loenatix

Loenatix organic tee
Picture from Loenatix’s website

Black T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. The shirt is printed in Amsterdam with waterbased ink.
Price €32,50
Shop here

8. Human BeIN from Ipsilon Paris

 

 

 

T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. The text is printed with water-based ink. The star is embroidered.
Price €70,-
Shop here

9. Little donkey from Armedangels

 

 

 

T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. Available in white or grey.
Price €39,90
Shop here

10. Simone from Belle’s Club Amsterdam

 

 

 

This one is not organic but made it to the list due to its sustainability efforts. This shirt is designed in Amsterdam and made in India with wind energy. The Simone tee is made of 70 percent recycled cotton and 30 percent recycled polyester.
Price €39,-
Shop here

I hope you get inspired and next time you are looking for t-shirts, give it a try and look for organic cotton as the main fabric. If you are out of a budget, try to go to a second-hand shop first, before buying fast fashion brands. There are a lot of ‘old’ clothes ready to have a ‘new’ life.

With Love,

Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Jan ‘n June

Yes! I found another fair and ethical fashion brand. This time I want to introduce you to Jan ‘n June. Jula and Anna started the eco-fashion label out of personal need for stylish, sustainable and affordable clothes. Back in 2013, fair fashion wasn’t easy to find.  After a summer night and a couple of wine glasses, they decided to start with one.

Transparency it´s at the core of Jann ‘n June. For Jula and Anna is very important to produce the clothes as responsible as possible with the environment and the garment workers. The clothes are produced in Wroclaw, Poland in a family-owned factory, where the girls keep an eye on the production. They visit the manufacturer on regular basis to define the workmanship for each article and auditing the factory. They only work with one partner in order to keep it simple and transparent. All the materials come from Turkey, Portugal or India and are GOTS or IVN Best certified. On every garment, you can read about the origin of it.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing the dress “Cannes Flow Black” from Jan ‘n June. The pictures were made in Amersfoort by the photographer Mitchel Lensink.
Check his work HERE.

Picture by Mitchel Lensink

 

 

 

2 Mitchel Lensink_ Alisson-27
Picture by Mitchel Lensink

 

Picture by Mitchel Lensink

What I´m wearing:
Dress // Jan ‘n June (Get it here)
Bag // Matt & Nat (Get it here)
Boots // Second-lifestyle Amersfoort (second-hand shop)

With Love,
Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Troo

Ethically made lingerie has the bad reputation of being boring and basic. It took me some time until I found this sexy badass lingerie brand: Nette Rose that I discovered through Troo. A webshop that sells only ethically made pieces.

Slow and responsible fashion is at the core of the founders of Troo: Nic and Steff Fitzgerald.  For them is very important to partner up with young designers that also share the same beliefs. Producing beautiful and sexy clothes that are responsible as possible with the environment and with the garment workers.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing the bralettes from the brand Nette Rose that I got through Troo. This is a brand of intimates designed and produced by Megan Miller. The pieces are handmade in Cape Town (from the same country where the founders of Troo are from).
The pictures were made in my home by the talented photographer Marisa Broekhuizen Check her work HERE.

 

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Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

 

 

 

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Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

 

What I´m wearing:
Bralette // FREYA size S in burgundy from Nette Rose via Troo (Get it here)
Pants // Sideswept dhoti from Matter (Get it here)
Lipstick // Boho lipstick “figue” 309 via Blossom Up natuurlijke verzorging (Get it here)

 

DSC_8878
Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

 

 

 

DSC_8919
Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

What I´m wearing:
Bralette // ANNA size L from Nette Rose via Troo (Get it here)
Skirt // Lievevrouw snuffelmarkt Amersfoort
Lipstick // Boho lipstick figue 309 via Blossom Up natuurlijke verzorging (Get it here)

 

With Love,
Alisson

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