Sustainable Brand: Organic Basics

On my search for eco-friendly basic clothing, I found the Danish brand Organic Basics. The brand is based in Copenhagen and it has been active since 2015. Sustainability and ethical practices are at the core of the brand.

All of the clothes from Organic Basics are made from sustainable fabrics. The most commonly used fabric is organic cotton. The cotton is grown in Turkey without the use of pesticides, no toxic substances, no chemical fertilizer, and no bad chemicals. It is grown without genetically modified seeds, and it is GOTS certified (which means that apart from being certified organic, it is grown by humans that are treated like humans).

Besides organic cotton, they also use an innovative fabric called SilverTech. The fiber has real silver in it. Silver has historically been used as an antimicrobial. And it is also thermodynamic, which means that the fabric keeps you cool in the summer, and warm in the winter.  The purpose of using silver is to prevent the need for frequent washing. Wearing more and washing less is better for clothes and for the environment.

Another fabric that Organic Basics use is recycled nylon. Mechanically recycled nylon is a fiber developed from post-industrial waste, yarns from spinning factories, and waste from weaving mills. Recycled nylon uses 80% less and creates 90% fewer CO2 emissions compared to regular nylon.

Ethical labors are very important for Organic Basics. They only work with factories that have fair wages and treat employees with respect. The factories are located in Turkey. One in Izmir and the other one in Istanbul. In order to monitor the working conditions in Turkey, a small team from Organic Basics visit the cotton farms, and factories once every three months. While there, they also interact with the workers and spend time together.

Last week I place an order and it came by bike to my address.

The packaging is made from recycled materials.
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Wearing the white organic cotton women’s tee. Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography.

The collection of Organic Basics is timeless, basic and minimalistic. Check it out and use my code: ALISSONOBC2 to get €15 Discount at www.organicbasics.com

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Different Approaches To Sustainable Fashion Explained

Sustainable fashion can be defined as clothing, shoes, and accessories that are manufactured taking into account both environmental and socio-economic aspects.
This implies continuous work to improve all stages of the product’s lifecycle from design, raw material production, manufacturing, transport, storage, marketing, and final sale. To use, reuse, repair, remake and recycling of the product and its components.

Fair or Ethical Fashion is clothing that is made taking into account the wealth being of the garment workers. It covers a range of issues such as working conditions, exploitation, fair trade, fair wages, improvement of the worker’s quality of life, sustainable production, the environment, and animal welfare.

Slow fashion advocates the principle of producing fewer new items. And only produce items of good quality, in a clean environment, and fairness for both consumers and producers. Slow fashion also means, to stick with what you have for a long time. Some elements of the slow fashion philosophy include: buying vintage clothes, redesigning old clothes, shopping from smaller producers, making clothes and accessories at home and buying garments that last longer.

Vegan fashion is clothing and accessories made from cruelty-free sources. Where no animal products were used in making the garments and gear, and no animal was harmed. Vegan fashion doesn’t use any leather, wool, feathers, silk or fur. Instead, the clothes are made from fabrics such as cotton, linen or hemp. Manmade materials such as polyester, acrylic or nylon. And innovative materials like pinatex made from pineapple leaves or mycoworks made from mushroom skin.

Organic fashion is clothing made from materials grown in compliance with organic agricultural standards. The production ensures that there is no use of pesticides in the growing process. Organic fashion takes care of the health and land of the farmers.  Organic clothing may be composed of cotton, jute, silk, ramie, or wool.

Minimalist fashion is a lifestyle that implies to have as little as possible. Minimalists stick to a limited color palette. Mostly monochromatic. The wardrobe consists of low-key but timeless pieces that work every day, no matter what’s fashionable at the time. This promotes less consumption.

 

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Picture: Unsplash

 

I hope you understand now all about sustainable fashion. Is there anything you would like me to research and explain to you? Let me know in the comments below.

With Love,

Alisson

Sustainable Brand: Komodo

Strolling down the sustainable webshop www.watmooi.nl I discovered the English brand Komodo. Their goal is to design beautiful clothes and at the same time to bring fair jobs in developing countries. People who work hard to make our clothes deserve respect and fair wages. The founder of Komodo believes that it is a privilege to be able to dress stylishly. But it is the responsibility of today’s fashion designers to make that style fair and sustainable. For the garment workers and for the environment.

Komodo works according to the SA-8000 standards in the factories in Bali and Kathmandu (SA stands for Social Accountability). Because of this, you know for sure that the workers get a good salary, there is no child or forced labor, there is a safe and healthy working environment, there is a clear approach to the prevention of accidents at work, there are clean sanitary facilities and clean drinking water, there is a maximum on the number of working hours per week; no more than 48 hours and 12 hours of overtime. We might think this is obvious, but sadly enough it is not in a lot of third world country factories.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the Remia sweater made from Organic Cotton. The pictures were made in The Netherlands by Marisa Elisa Photography.

Sustainable fashion brandSustainable Fashion LondonKomodo Sustainable Fashion BrandSustainable Fashion NetherlandsSustainable Fashion Blog

What I´m wearing:
Sweater // Komodo via www.watmooi.nl
Pants, shoes, and jacket // Second-hand
Bag from vegan leather // Denise Roobol
Sunglasses // Dick Moby Amsterdam

With Love,
Alisson

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Fashion Must-have: Little Black Dress

A Little black dress or better known as ‘LBD’ is a black simple and short dress. The origins date back to the 1920s designs of Coco Chanel. The intention was to create a trend that is long-lasting, versatile, and in a neutral color.  An LBD is essential in a woman wardrobe. It can be dressed up or down depending on the occasion. Worn with a jacket and pumps for doing business during the day and wear it with accessories and red lipstick during the night. I am a big fan of this everlasting trend. For me, it’s the perfect solution for when I don’t know what to wear.

Today I listed out my favorite LBD from sustainable brands for you:

1. Beaumont Organic

 

Ethically made in Portugal. It is reversible. This means you can wear it with a round neckline or a V neckline. The dress is made from natural fabrics. 55% linen and 45% organic cotton.

2. Armedangels

Armedangels
Picture from Armedangels’s website

Ethically made in Turkey. Perfect for all the seasons. This dress is made from 100% Lyocell (Tencel®).

3. People Tree

 


A classic dress to have forever.  Made from 95% organic certified cotton and 5% elastane jersey. Ethically made in India by Assisi Garments. Assisi Garments is a social enterprise. The skilled artisans at Assisi transform Fairtrade and organic cotton fibers into beautiful handmade garments.

4. Know The Origin

 


Ethically made in India. This dress is made from 95% organic cotton and 5% elastane. Perfect to wear it with sneakers to go to work. And to wear it with heels for the night.

5. Miss Green

Little Black Dress Ethically made
Picture from Miss Green’s website

Ethically and environmentally responsible made. This dress you can wear with skinny jeans as a long blouse or with ankle boots as a dress. It is made from 100% Tencel.
I hope you get inspired and next time you are looking for a little black dress, you give it a try and look for sustainable brands. If you are out of a budget, try to go to a second-hand shop first, before buying fast fashion brands. There are a lot of ‘old’ clothes ready to have a ‘new’ life.

With Love,

Alisson

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Cotton VS Polyester

We are surrounded by fabrics. The clothes we wear, the sheets we sleep with, the upholstery on our furniture, the rug we walk on. We can’t avoid them.

Before the invention of polyester in 1941, most used fabrics were of natural origin. Wool, cashmere, silk, linen, hemp, and cotton. If you start reading the fabric labels of today, you will most likely find synthetic materials like rayon, acrylic, acetate, nylon, and polyester. Synthetic fabrics are cheaper than natural ones. But the environment and our health are paying the real price of those cheap synthetic fabrics.

The most popular synthetic fabric is polyester. It is cheap and versatile. This is the main reason it has become so famous in the garment industry. Besides the price, polyester is popular because of its properties. It is wrinkle-free, long-lasting and dries quickly. High-quality polyester keeps in shape well and doesn’t shrink. However, due to the rise of fast fashion, nowadays most of the polyester clothes on the market are cheap and of bad quality.

Polyester is a petroleum-based fiber. Each year more than 70 billion barrels of oil are used to produce it. It is made from a synthetic, polymer known as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in the combination of harmful chemicals. This all sounds extremely scientific, but basically, polyester is a kind of plastic. Which means that it is not biodegradable and it adds to the microplastic water pollution problem. Every time a polyester garment is washed, it releases tiny particles that end in our oceans. When we wear synthetic fabrics, our body is in touch with all the harmful chemicals that are used in the production process. Also with the dyes. In case of polyester, the dyes are 100% chemical.

Most of the polyester yarns are produced in third world countries where environmental regulations are non-existent. Air and water pollution is often discharged untreated, harming the communities that surround the manufacturing plants. The production of polyester uses less water than the production of cotton, but polyester cannot be dyed using natural dyes. This means that the damage of water supplies is higher.

The most popular natural fabric is cotton. These are the main properties: Cotton is soft and breathable. It absorbs moisture to keep body temperature stable. Depending on the weave and finish, cotton can be also strong and rough as canvas. Cotton fibers are easy to dye with natural dyes and making it a good option for sensitive skin. As a completely natural material grown in fields, cotton is biodegradable. The fabric will break down over time. But in order to be environmentally friendly, the cotton must be grown organic thus without chemicals. Because once the fabric starts to biodegrade, the chemical parts of it are broken down as well. These substances end up in the ground and damage the land, plants, and animals. Organic cotton does not do that. The production of organic cotton is made without the use of pesticides, synthetic growth regulators and the seeds are not genetically modified.

After learning all those facts, it is clear to me that cotton has a more positive impact on the skin and on the environment than polyester. For the outfit of today, I teamed up again with Matter: a brand that makes responsible clothes from natural fabrics.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing ‘The lounge lunghi + Philippines teal’ pants from their new collection. The pants have a long fabric belt for an easy wrap around the waist.  These pants were printed in Jaipur and were stitched in Delhi. The material is a blend of 95% cotton and 5% linen. It was block-printed with azo-free dyes. The pictures were made in Amersfoort by photographer Marisa Elisa Photography.

Sustainable brandSustainable pantsMatter printsCotton and linnen pants

What I´m wearing:
Pants // Lunghi + Philippines teal from Matter (get it here)
Top // Second-hand from Second Lifestyle shop Amersfoort
Shoes // Ethletic
Bag 1 // From an artisan village in Colombia named Usiacuri
Bag 2 // Matt & Nat

Learn more about Matter and their sustainable and ethical production here.

With Love,

Alisson

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Top 10 Organic Cotton T-shirts

Summer is just around the corner! Let’s try to make this coming season greener than it already is. How? By investing in organic and ethically made T-shirts. You might ask yourself why to invest in organic cotton? Here some facts:
– Organic cotton is grown without the use of insecticides, pesticides and chemical fertilizers.
– It protects the farmers, from being exposed to toxic chemicals.
– It eliminates the greenhouse gas emissions created through the production of chemical fertilizers.
– The soils remain healthy and sequester more carbon helping to mitigate climate change.
– Water consumption is reduced as well as the C02 emissions per tonne of cotton fiber.
Today I listed out my favorite sustainable T-shirt brands for you:

1. White T-shirt from Organic Basics

Organic cotton women's tee

Basic T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. Available in black or white.
Price €32,-
Use this code to get 20% discount: OBxsimmonds20
Shop here

2. Bisou on Stripes from Armedangels

Stripes t-shirt organic cotton Armedangels
Picture from armedangels’s website

Striped T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. Available in navy/white or red/white.
Price €39,90
Shop here

3. Ribbed T-shirt from Shop Saar

 

 

 

Made from a sturdy ribbed fabric of 95% organic cotton and 5% elastane. Available in petrol blue, pink, henna red and light blue. You can choose the kind of neck and sleeve you prefer.
Price €55,-
Shop here

4. Red heart T-shirt from Real Fake

Real fake organic tee
Picture from Geitenwollenwinkel’s website

White oversized T-shirt with a heart print at the heart height. Ethically made of 100% organic cotton. Available with a red or blue heart.
Price €45,-
Shop here

5. Basic T-shirt from Noumenon

 

 

 

Basic T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton.
Price €55,-
Shop here

6. Bonita T-shirt from Thinking MU

white organic tee
Picture from Sophie Stone’s website

The shirt has the text ‘Bonita’ embroidered above the left chest, which means ‘beautiful’. Made of 100% organic cotton.
Price €39,95
Shop here

7. Fake T-shirt from Loenatix

Loenatix organic tee
Picture from Loenatix’s website

Black T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. The shirt is printed in Amsterdam with waterbased ink.
Price €32,50
Shop here

8. Human BeIN from Ipsilon Paris

 

 

 

T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. The text is printed with water-based ink. The star is embroidered.
Price €70,-
Shop here

9. Little donkey from Armedangels

 

 

 

T-shirt made of 100% organic cotton. Available in white or grey.
Price €39,90
Shop here

10. Simone from Belle’s Club Amsterdam

 

 

 

This one is not organic but made it to the list due to its sustainability efforts. This shirt is designed in Amsterdam and made in India with wind energy. The Simone tee is made of 70 percent recycled cotton and 30 percent recycled polyester.
Price €39,-
Shop here

I hope you get inspired and next time you are looking for t-shirts, give it a try and look for organic cotton as the main fabric. If you are out of a budget, try to go to a second-hand shop first, before buying fast fashion brands. There are a lot of ‘old’ clothes ready to have a ‘new’ life.

With Love,

Alisson

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Learn More About Fast Fashion

Did you watched “The True Cost” and want to learn more about Fast Fashion? I have gathered seven videos for you to learn who is paying the real price of cheap clothes.
Here they are:

1. Fashion Factories Undercover – Real Stories


2. Sweatshop – Deadly Fashion


3. Made in Bangladesh – The fifth estate


4. Fast Fashion’s Effect on People, The Planet & You – Patrick Woodyard


5. How to Engage with Ethical Fashion – Clara Vuletich


6. Fashion: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver


7. The Wardrobe To Die For – Lucy Siegle

Do you feel motivated to start supporting ethical brands? Check my sustainable shopping guide and get inspired.

With Love,

Alisson

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Sexy And Sustainable Made Undies

Cheap underwear is made from synthetic fabrics. Mostly polyester and nylon. These fabrics are loaded with chemicals that  are not bad for your health, ‘apparently’.  The garment workers who made such underwears are suffering and not getting paid enough to make our €2,- panties. We need to stop buying cheap undies. And whether it’s healthy or not we need to stop rubbing toxic chemicals on our most sensitive parts.

I admit it. My underwear drawer contains a lot of cheap H&M and Victoria’s Secrets panties. Those purchases were from before my conscious time. Now that I have been slowly replacing my wardrobe with ethical brands, the time has come to start having underwears from sustainable materials. I started my research and have been adding quality underwear to my drawer. While ethical and slow fashion is growing by the minute there are also new brands making ethical lingerie that do more than keep you comfy. I have gathered five of my favorite underwear companies for you:

1. Erlich Textil

Erlich is based in Cologne, Germany. They make timeless and sexy lingerie with responsible materials. They work with a family-owned textile manufacturer in Romania. The producers they work with use the GOTS standard (Global Organic Textile Standard), ÖkoTex100 certification and carries the BSCI seal of quality (Business Social Compliance Initiative). The BSCI is an organization that works to protect workers’ rights. The garments are made of organic cotton or modal.

2. Anekdot

Anekdot makes ethical underwear and beachwear. The boutique is based in Berlin. The complete process from sketch to finished garment is hand-craft in the studio in Berlin. In the process, they upcycle and use leftovers of fabric as much as possible. They only make the garments they can with the fabrics they have. That’s why the stock is very limited. Their designs are sexy and bold.

3. Troo

Slow and responsible fashion is at the core of the founders of Troo: Nic and Steff Fitzgerald.  For them it is very important to partner up with young designers that also share the same beliefs. Producing beautiful and sexy undies that are responsible as possible with the environment and with the garment workers. The brand of their bralettes is called: Nette Rose. Designed and produced by Megan Miller. All the pieces are handmade in Cape Town (from the same country where the founders of Troo are from). The boutique is based in Switzerland.

4. WORON

WORON is a Scandinavian Brand based in Copenhagen, founded by sisters Arina and Anya Woron. They make comfortable and timeless garments. The fabrics they use are all plant-based. A combination of European produced modal and organic cotton are in all of their pieces. The garments are made in a family owned factory in Hungary. The factory has the ÖkoTex and GOTS certifications. Hungary has a strict working regulations both in terms of minimum wages and working standards. The factory is mostly run by women, employing mainly women and they offer additional benefits for working mothers. (Yeah!)

5. Comazo

Comazo is a German family business. They only use organic cotton for their garments. All the labels as well, sewing threads, and the buttons meet the GOTS standard. Comazo understand bra’s. They know which cup size you can make with organic cotton and when more cup seams are needed for extra support. The straps are slightly wider so it won’t cut into the skin. Due to the soft materials and the careful production process, without chemicals, the Comazo underwear is suitable for people with allergies or sensitive skin.

Which one is your favorite?
Look at the whole list of sustainable underwear brands in my shopping guide.

With Love,
Alisson

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5 ETHICAL, ECO & VEGAN SHOES FOR THE WINTER

Leather alternative quality shoes it is a relatively new product which makes it difficult to find in regular shops. Luckily I found the Dutch webshop “En-&“. The owner: Laura, started the webshop where she only sells eco and vegan shoes. For her, it’s important to wear fashionable shoes, that no animal was needed to be the harm in the process. If you are looking for a more sustainable pair of shoes, then En& is the place to be. After checking out their current collection, I listed out my favorite pairs for you:

1. Bline black or brown

Made from microfibers with a special “leather” look. The microfibers are made from a combination of nylon, cotton, and polyester. The material is OEKO-TEX certified which guarantees that the production don’t make any waste of water or energy. Microfibers are as tough as leather and less prejudicial to the environment.
Shop the boots here

2. Etna airbag white

Ecological, breathable and anti-allergy boots made of recycled airbag. The production comes with the intention of giving a new life to a material that is no longer useful, reusing the nylon present in the airbags and give them a new purpose.
Shop them here

3. Basic black or white

Made out of Pineapple leaf fibers. This fabric is produced by an English company that works with local farmers in The Philippines. The pineapple production is not specifically to make shoes, they only use the pineapple leaves from pineapple that are consumed. The production is made by local farmers where the human rights and the labor laws are respected. Pineapple leaves are waterproof, breathable and anti-allergic.
Shop them here

4. Bare black

Picture by Mitchel Lensink

Made from pineapple leaf fibers. Available also in white and gold.
Shop them here
(See here for outfit inspirations with this sweater)

5. Lorena black or brown

Made from ecological breathable microfiber.
Shop them here

With Love,
Alisson

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Sustainable Brand: Troo

Ethically made lingerie has the bad reputation of being boring and basic. It took me some time until I found this sexy badass lingerie brand: Nette Rose that I discovered through Troo. A webshop that sells only ethically made pieces.

Slow and responsible fashion is at the core of the founders of Troo: Nic and Steff Fitzgerald.  For them is very important to partner up with young designers that also share the same beliefs. Producing beautiful and sexy clothes that are responsible as possible with the environment and with the garment workers.

On these series of pictures, I´m wearing the bralettes from the brand Nette Rose that I got through Troo. This is a brand of intimates designed and produced by Megan Miller. The pieces are handmade in Cape Town (from the same country where the founders of Troo are from).
The pictures were made in my home by the talented photographer Marisa Broekhuizen Check her work HERE.

 

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Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

 

 

 

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Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

 

What I´m wearing:
Bralette // FREYA size S in burgundy from Nette Rose via Troo (Get it here)
Pants // Sideswept dhoti from Matter (Get it here)
Lipstick // Boho lipstick “figue” 309 via Blossom Up natuurlijke verzorging (Get it here)

 

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Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

 

 

 

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Picture by Marisa Elisa Photography

What I´m wearing:
Bralette // ANNA size L from Nette Rose via Troo (Get it here)
Skirt // Lievevrouw snuffelmarkt Amersfoort
Lipstick // Boho lipstick figue 309 via Blossom Up natuurlijke verzorging (Get it here)

 

With Love,
Alisson

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