OOTD: Komodo

Strolling down the sustainable webshop www.watmooi.nl I discovered the English brand Komodo. Their goal is to design beautiful clothes and at the same time to bring fair jobs in developing countries. People who work hard to make our clothes deserve respect and fair wages. The founder of Komodo believes that it is a privilege to be able to dress stylishly. But it is the responsibility of today’s fashion designers to make that style fair and sustainable. For the garment workers and for the environment.

Komodo works according to the SA-8000 standards in the factories in Bali and Kathmandu (SA stands for Social Accountability). Because of this, you know for sure that the workers get a good salary, there is no child or forced labor, there is a safe and healthy working environment, there is a clear approach to the prevention of accidents at work, there are clean sanitary facilities and clean drinking water, there is a maximum on the number of working hours per week; no more than 48 hours and 12 hours of overtime. We might think this is obvious, but sadly enough it is not in a lot of third world country factories.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the Remia sweater made from Organic Cotton. The pictures were made in The Netherlands by Marisa Elisa Photography.

Sustainable fashion brandSustainable Fashion LondonKomodo Sustainable Fashion BrandSustainable Fashion NetherlandsSustainable Fashion Blog

What I´m wearing:
Sweater // Komodo via www.watmooi.nl
Pants, shoes, and jacket // Second-hand
Bag from vegan leather // Denise Roobol
Sunglasses // Dick Moby Amsterdam

With Love,
Alisson

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Wat Mooi – Sustainable Fashion Favorites For The Autumn

Sustainable fashion has the bad reputation of being hippy, lumpy, itchy, hempy and unstylish. Nowadays producing ethical fashion and good looking pieces is becoming more of a priority for brands. It can be hard to look for those brands but luckily some web shops make it easy for us to find them. I want to show you my latest discovery: www.WatMooi.nl. This webshop only sells clothes from sustainable brands. Every brand chooses its own way of making sustainable fashion. Some brands pay particular attention to people in developing countries, other labels try to be gentle with the environment as much as possible. Completely sustainable does not exist yet, but it is important that some brands are doing the best they can at least.  After checking out their current collection I listed out my favorite items to make this a sustainable autumn season.

Pink ruffle blouse

This pink ruffle blouse from the Alchemist is romantic, tough and bohemian. Easy to combine with jeans or a skirt. The blouse is made of 100% viscose.

Yellow and beige sweater

Sustainable sweater Trui Wol Recycled Stripe Honey
This striped sweater from the Dutch brand Alchemist is a basic must-have for the autumn and winter. It is fairly made from recycled wool. Nice to combine with sneakers or with boots.

Pink, grey and yellow sweater

This gray knit sweater from the Dutch brand Alchemist is great for the coming season. It is made with responsible animal-friendly wool. Wool is a great material. It is soft and warm. Note: better wash it by hand.

Colorful stripes sweater


Stripes are always a good idea. The color combination of yellow, white, red, dark blue and light pink provide a real fashion look.  The sweater from Armedangels is made of 100% GOTS certified organic cotton.

Pink sweater

Soft pink is a color that is becoming trendy more and more. This sweater from Armedangels is made of 100% organic cotton. A lovely sweater that is easy to combine and is both sporty and classic.

Indoor baseball jacket

This baseball jacket from King Louie Organic is great to wear indoors. It is soft and comfortable. The jacket is made from natural synthetic fibers. The zipper is nickel free.

Black biker jacket

This biker jacket is made of vegan suede. This is made in Italy from PET bottles and recycled polyester. Recycling means a reduction of energy consumption and CO2 emissions. The jacket is made by hand in Portugal. So you really have a unique and timeless item in your closet that you can enjoy for years.

I hope you get inspired and next time you are looking for sustainable clothes and accessories you give it a try and check WatMooi out. You can shop online HERE

With Love,

Alisson

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12 Loco Things Dutchies Do Part 2

This month I celebrate that I live in The Netherlands for three years. It’s the third country I have lived in and the third one I call home. Before NL I lived in Germany. I thought I didn’t need to integrate or learn about the culture anymore. But the past three years have totally shown me the opposite. I already blogged about 12 crazy things that Dutchies do, but today, I want to share with you twelve more habits that I haven’t seen people doing in any other place I’ve lived before. Get ready!

1. Bread
Dutch people love bread. For breakfast and for lunch, bread is the Dutchies favorite food. Every Saturday before doing grocery shopping, a good Dutchie makes space in the freezer to be sure that the four extra loaves of bread will fit so a happy week can begin.  Dutchies know every trick on how to unfroze bread. The favorite trick is to put the bread on top of the heather or on a spot where a sun ray is shining.

2. A closet full of food
A typical Dutchie house has a special place, mostly under the stairs. Full of food! They call it a ‘voorraadkast’. Three pots of peanut butter, five bars of chocolate, twenty different kinds of cookies, chips, cans of soup, bottles of cola, beer, cleaning stuff… Dutchies are well prepared in case of… war? a surprise party?
Dutch Funny Habits

3. Birthday calendar
The best place to remember when ‘tante Marijke’ has birthday number sixty, is in the comfort of the toilet. Dutchies love to hang birthday calendars in their bathrooms. More precisely in the guest bathroom. It’s very handy to remind yourself that you have to send a ‘verjaardagskaart’ when you are doing your business.

4. But please only one
When you get invited to have a coffee at the house of the parents of your Dutchie partner, remember to answer with the word ‘lekker’ when they ask you if you want coffee. Besides coffee, you will be offered cookies, chocolate OR cake. OR, not AND. This means you are expected to eat only this one thing you choose. If you happen to eat more than one piece, you can expect a comment like ‘Oh, but you already had one’ or ‘you must be hungry’. It makes you feel very guilty about eating two or more pieces of sweet. This rule applies to birthdays as well. There might be three different cakes. But you are allowed to choose only one piece.
Dutch Vlaai

5. Is water not ok?
As soon as you visit a Dutchie, you will be asked ‘Wat wil je drinken?’ (What do you want to drink?). Coffee, tea, something fresh, juice? You are not even done hanging your coat and you are already welcomed with that question. If you politely answer the question with just some tap water, your Dutchie host will surprisingly repeat that you could get a soda or a juice instead. Dutchies don’t like to offer water. I guess they don’t want you to think that they are cheap?

6. Camping
A well-respected Dutchie goes or has been going to ANWB’s recommended campings of the south of France and Italy in the summer. When I hear my Dutch partner talk about camping, I imagine a tent in nature, ‘The Revenant’ style. Oh, how wrong I was. Dutchies go camping deluxe. They take their whole house with them (camping version). From cutlery, pans, pots, cups, chairs, fridge, heater, veranda to air mattress plus bed. Dutchies have all they need to go camping for weeks. The campings have, all they need to survive in nature. Washing machines, restaurants, swimming pool, disco, pubs…
Dutch Camping7. The (test) emergency alarm
Don’t be scared if you hear a frightening sound on the streets in the middle of the day. It’s not that the Hunger Games have started. It’s probably 12:00am on the first Monday of the month. The day where the emergency alarm gets tested in the whole country. Dutchies are used to it and just ignore it. I keep on fantasizing about being the chosen one to represent my district. Now for real. What happens if there is an emergency on the first Monday of the month at 12 o’clock?

8. Dus
If you want to show off in front of your Dutch friends or colleagues, just add the word ‘dus’ (‘so’) in all of your sentences. At the beginning or at the end, Duchies use the word ‘dus’ a lot! It can be used to communicate a wide range of thoughts, feelings, and emotions. It can be everything from an angry stopword to a suggestive come on and more.

9. Fireworks
Most countries will have a few safe firework displays on New Year’s Eve. It starts at midnight and lasts around 20-30 minutes. And that’s it with the fireworks. Everyone can go back to the party. On the other hand, in The Netherlands, the fireworks are the party. Every year Dutchies spend a lot of money and go fireworks-mad. The steady stream of fireworks begins the 31st of December around noon. Climaxing with utter chaos at midnight. Grown-ups and !children! will light up the fireworks one after another until around 2:00am. I’ve never seen anything like this. I might be a party pooper, but this custom I dislike a lot. And by the way, my dog as well (he’s from Spain).

10. Dutch old houses… why?
Most of the old houses in The Netherlands are designed very weirdly. In theory, the idea is good. It’s all about hygiene. But in practice: super annoying. I am talking about having the toilet separate from the shower. Not only in a different room but on another floor! And how about the mini sink that you can’t actually use, so you end up washing your hands in the kitchen. And please! Why old houses have dangerous stairs?

11. Geslaagd!
Walking around the city at around June – July you will wonder two things. The first is why do Dutchies hang the Dutch flag in the middle of the summer. And the second is why is there a backpack hanging below the flag? Well, Dutchies are very proud to announce that they have a graduated kid from school. So proud the whole neighborhood should know. I think this weird tradition is actually cool! I guess this is a way of saying goodbye to school and embrace new changes.
Funny Dutch Habits

12. December
December is the most wonderful time of the year. Dutchies makes sure of that. The celebrations start on December 5th with Sinterklaas. A holy old man that comes all the way from Spain on a steamboat to bring you presents. You set your shoe by the chimney and Sinterklaas, fills it with treats. Then the 24th there’s Christmas evening, the 25th is the first Christmas day where Santa Claus (or the Kerstman) brings more gifts. And because two days of Christmas is too less to get around to all friends and family Dutchies also celebrate the second Christmas day on the 26th. So much Christmas. I love it!
Sinterklaas and AmerigoI´m going to leave the ‘haring”, the real-life doll when someone turns 50 and some more loco things for next year. For now, I can only say that even though the Dutch culture is different than mine, I have learned to like it and embrace it. Some things I find funny, others I really like and I´m learning from them.
Thanks to all the Dutchies that have embraced me and made me feel welcome in The Netherlands the past years.

With love,

Alisson

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Read 12 loco things Dutchies do part 1

Sustainable Sunglasses from Dick Moby

On my search for sustainable sunglasses, I found the Amsterdam based brand: Dick Moby. Tim and Robbert are the founders of this cool brand. They went on a surfing trip and were confronted with this huge plastic-in-the-ocean problem. With a big love for the sea, which surfers and sailors usually have, Tim and Robbert are motivated to start a sustainable company. They address the plastic waste problem by making high-quality sunglasses out of biodegradable and recycled plastic. In 2014 ‘Dick Moby’ was founded.

They produce their eyewear without creating more waste in the process. The glasses are handmade in Italy. In their collection, they offer different shapes, colors, and styles. From hipster to retro, they have all kinds of cool frames. The glasses are made with UV protective lenses. Thus, perfect for the summer.

Recycling is at the core of this brand. The cleaning cloth that comes with each pair of glasses is made from recycled PET plastic bottles. One cloth is made of approximately seven used plastic bottles. The leather case that comes with every pair is also made from recycled leather.

In July I went to their sample sale in Amsterdam and got myself these sunglasses:

 

med_res

Which one is your favorite? Check their whole collection at www.dick-moby.com

With Love,

Alisson

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Learn About: Semi-Synthetic​ Fabrics

In this new series on my blog, I explain about natural and synthetic fabrics. There is a category that fits in the middle, which I am going to write about here. I am talking about semi-synthetic fabrics. Those fabrics are made from a combination of a natural raw material with a synthetic material. The most common natural materials are wood pulp, beech trees, eucalyptus tree, and bamboo.
Today, I am explaining to you the advantages and disadvantages of the most common semi-synthetic fibers.

Rayon

is fabricated from wood pulp. It is combined with synthetic materials through a chemical process and then turned into fibers.
Rayon is:

  • Soft
  • Cheap
  • Smooth
  • Easy to dye
  • Comfortable
  • Highly absorbent
  • Versatile – It can imitate the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton, and linen

The disadvantages of rayon are:

  • Bad quality
  • Pills easily
  • Wrinkles
  • Shrinks
  • Loses appearance and shape when wet
  • There are toxic dyes and bleach in the production process
  • Workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used in the production
  • Because it comes from trees, it might contribute to deforestation problems

Rayon fabric

Viscose

is a type of rayon. Both rayon and viscose share the same manufacturing process but they differ in the materials used. Rayon can be made with cellulose from a variety of plants, viscose is made from wood pulp or cotton linter.
Viscose is:

  • Soft
  • Cheap
  • Breathable
  • Easy to dye
  • Smooth – Drapes beautifully
  • Feels like silk – Known to be a cruelty-free kind of silk

The disadvantages of viscose are:

  • Difficult to wash
  • Not durable – due to its high concentration of caustic soda
  • Prone to stretching and bagging
  • Loses appearance and shape when wet
  • Highly absorbent – Which may result in spots
  • There are toxic dyes and bleach in the production process
  • Workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used in the production
  • Because it comes from trees, it might contribute to deforestation problems

Modal

is a type of rayon, made by spinning reconstituted cellulose, from beech trees. While rayon may be made of the wood pulp of a number of different trees, modal uses only beechwood
Modal is:

  • Soft
  • Shiny
  • Comfortable
  • Absorbent
  • Easy to care

  • Easy to dye

  • Smooth – Drapes beautifully
  • Feels like silk – Known to be a cruelty-free kind of silk
  • Breathable – Good material for sport clothes

The disadvantages of modal are:

  • Prone to stretching and pilling.
  • There are toxic dyes and bleach in the production process
  • Workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used in the production
  • Because it comes from trees, it might contribute to deforestation problems

Modal fabric

Lyocell

is a type of rayon. Made by dissolving bleached wood pulp.
Lyocell is:

  • Soft
  • Absorbent
  • Expensive to produce
  • Shiny – Silk appearance
  • Very strong when wet or dry
  • Resistant to wrinkles
  • Easy to wash

  • Drapes well
  • Can simulate a variety of textures such as suede, leather, and silk
  • The production creates little waste

The disadvantages of Lyocell are:

  • Prone to pilling
  • Uses a lot of chemical in the production process
  • Difficult for dyes to bind to it – The dyes required are toxic

Bamboo

is a fiber that is extracted from natural bamboo. The production is similar to the one of rayon, but instead of using wood pulp, it uses bamboo.
Bamboo is:

  • Anti-static
  • Easy to dye
  • Soft – With a texture similar to silk
  • Breathable and absorbent – It keeps the skin dry and odor free
  • It has the ability to regulate body temperature
  • The production doesn’t need pesticides or fertilizers
  • The plant grows very fast – It regenerates after being cut without the need of replanting (similar to lawn)
  • Biodegradable

The disadvantages of bamboo are:

  • Pills very easy
  • There are toxic chemicals in the production process
  • The fibers absorb a lot of sweat and can encourage microbial growth

Bamboo fabric

While the production of semi-synthetic fibers uses natural raw materials, the transformation to fabric and garments use many harsh, even toxic and chemicals in the processes. As you can see, all of the fibers have advantages and disadvantages. I personally find semi-synthetic fibers too harmful in general. I prefer to buy and wear garments from natural fibers as much as possible. This is a personal decision but whatever you choose, it’s good to know about the fabric of your garments. I hope you find this information useful and will help you to become more aware of semi-synthetic fabrics. If you want to learn more about natural and synthetic fibers, you can read my latest post about this subject here, and here.

With Love,

Alisson

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Learn more about cotton and polyester
Learn more about natural fabrics
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Learn About: Synthetic Fabrics

In the journey towards a more sustainable wardrobe, I came across the topic of fabrics. The production of garments whether from natural or synthetic fabrics cost a lot of resources. Natural fibers have a better impact on the environment than synthetic ones. But in order to know more about this topic, I will show you the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthetic fibers.

Polyester

is the most common synthetic fiber in the market. Chemical reactions are necessary in during the production of polyester and that involves coal, petroleum, air, and water.

Polyester:

  • Strong
  • Flexible
  • Dries quickly
  • Durable
  • Resists wrinkles
  • Doesn’t shrink
  • Inexpensive
  • Easy to wash

Disadvantages of polyester:

  • Not breathable
  • It builds up static
  • Can cause bad smell
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • The production requires a lot of energy
  • Causes an allergic reaction in some people
  • Microfibers come off during washing, which ends up polluting the oceans
  • It is difficult to dye, which requires a lot of toxic dyes and bleach in the production process

Polyester fabric

Acrylic

is made from a polymer. It is like polyester, a petrochemical fiber. The fabric is often used for sweaters, as linings for boots and gloves, as well as in furnishing fabrics and carpets. Some acrylic is used as a less expensive alternative to cashmere.

Acrylic is:

  • Soft
  • Lightweight
  • Warm – with a wool-like feel
  • Colourfast
  • Machine washable
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Inexpensive

The disadvantages of acrylic:

  • Painful to knit with
  • It is flammable
  • Pills easily
  • It builds up static
  • It doesn’t breath
  • Can cause bad smell
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • It’s hard or even impossible to recycle
  • The production requires toxic chemicals
  • Microfibers come off during washing, which ends up polluting the oceans

Research has found that acrylic is responsible for releasing nearly 730,000 tiny synthetic particles (microplastics) per wash. Five times more than polyester-cotton blend fabric, and nearly 1.5 times as many as polyester. ( “Accumulation of Microplastic on Shorelines Woldwide: Sources and Sinks”)

Green acrylic fabric

Nylon

is a petrochemical man-made fiber. It was developed in order to make a synthetic replacement for silk.

Nylon is:

  • Strong
  • Weather resistant
  • Versatile
  • Water repellent
  • Machine washable
  • Dries quickly
  • Durable
  • Inexpensive

The disadvantages of nylon are:

  • It builds up static
  • It can irritate the skin
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • The production requires toxic chemicals
  • Energy-intensive
  • Microfibers come off during washing, which ends up polluting the oceans

Nylon fabric

Spandex

is made from petrochemicals as well. It is also called Elastane or Lycra and it’s usually found blended with other fabrics.

Spandex is:

  • Elastic
  • Stretch
  • Retains its shape

The disadvantages of spandex are:

  • It breaks down over time
  • It becomes brittle
  • It isn’t biodegradable
  • Energy-intensive
  • Polluting to make
  • The production requires toxic chemicals

Spandex

Rayon

is a fiber that is extracted or fabricated from wood pulp. Rayon is considered as a semisynthetic fiber.  It comes from wood but in order to make the fibers, it is combined with synthetic materials. Types of rayon include viscose, modal, and lyocell. Each of which differs in the manufacturing process.

Rayon is:

  • Versatile – It can imitate the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton, and linen
  • Easy to dye
  • Soft
  • Smooth
  • Comfortable
  • Highly absorbent
  • Cheap

The disadvantages of rayon are:

  • Bad quality
  • Pills easily
  • Wrinkles
  • Shrinks
  • Loses appearance and shape when wet
  • There are toxic dyes and bleach in the production process
  • Workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used in the production
  • Because it comes from trees, it might contribute to deforestation problems

Rayon fabric

As you can see, all of the fibers have advantages and disadvantages. I personally find synthetic fibers too harmful in general. I prefer to buy and wear garments from natural fibers as much as possible. This is a personal decision but whatever you choose, it’s good to know about the fabric of your garments. I hope you find this information useful and helps you to become more aware of synthetic fabrics. If you want to learn more about natural fibers, you can read my latest post about this subject here.

With Love,

Alisson

Learn more about Natural Fabrics
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Learn About: Natural Fabrics

In the journey towards a more sustainable wardrobe, I came across to the topic of fabrics. A topic I never cared, until I started to learn more about the problem that synthetic fabrics bring to our oceans. The production of garments whether from natural or synthetic fabrics cost a lot of resources. But natural fibers have a better impact on the environment than synthetic ones. Natural fibers are better for the skin and kinder on the environment. Today, I am explaining to you the advantages and disadvantages of the most common natural fibers.

Cotton

is one of the most common natural fibers in the market. It comes from a plant.
Cotton is:

  • Soft
  • Easy to wash
  • Breathable – Great option for hot weather and for baby clothing
  • Hypoallergenic – Does not irritate the skin
  • Absorbent – It works great as cloth diapers
  • Organic cotton is free of chemicals and is biodegradable

The disadvantages of Cotton are:

  • The color fades over time
  • It wrinkles very fast
  • It can shrink
  • The crops use a lot of water
  • It uses pesticides
  • Most of the regular cotton crops are GMO
  • There might be toxic dyes and bleach in the production process.

Organic cotton is characterized by a production process without the use of pesticides, synthetic growth regulators and the seeds are not genetically modified. There is also often a natural rotation of crops in the fields which helps to maintain a healthy soil.

Cotton Natural Fabric

Wool

is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals, including cashmere and mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, angora from rabbits, and other types of wool from camels. Wool mainly consists of protein together with a few percent lipids.
Wool is:

  • Waterproof
  • Fire resistant
  • Holds air
  • Durable – Clothes can last a very long time
  • It has the ability to regulate body temperature
  • It is crimped and elastic
  • Absorb moisture – it can absorb almost one-third of its own weight in water
  • Easy to dye
  • Biodegradable

The disadvantages of wool:

  • It involves animal cruelty issues
  • Shrinks in hot water
  • It can peel
  • Needs special care to wash
  • Causes an allergic reaction in some people
  • Toxic pesticides and chemicals might be used. You can avoid this by purchasing only organic wool.

Some fashion brands are starting to use recycled wool. The process demands less energy and less landfill required for sheep grazing. It saves raw materials and brings new life to old garments.

Linen

is a natural fiber that it’s made from the flax plant.
Linen is:

  • Durable
  • Lightweight
  • Soft and smooth – It gets softer the more it is washed
  • Cool and absorbent- Perfect for hot weather
  • The production uses less water than cotton
  • Biodegradable

The disadvantages of linen are:

  • It has a poor elasticity
  • It wrinkles easily
  • Might need special care to wash
  • Can be dyed with toxic chemicals

Linen Natural Fabric

 

Hemp

is a natural fiber that is made from the cannabis plant.
Hemp is:

  • Strong
  • Durable
  • Becomes softer over time
  • Resistant to mold and ultraviolet light
  • Absorbent
  • Breathable
  • When dye it retains its color better than any other fabric
  • No pesticides needed
  • It doesn’t damage the soil
  • The crops don’t need much water
  • Biodegradable

The disadvantages of hemp are:

  • It wrinkles
  • Not legally easy to grow for fabric production in some countries

Silk

is a natural protein fiber made from the cocoon of the silkworms.
Silk is:

  • Smooth
  • Soft
  • Lightweight
  • Natural shiny
  • Absorbent
  • Comfortable
  • Its low conductivity keeps warm air close to the skin during cold weather
  • Easy to dye
  • Biodegradable

The disadvantages of silk are:

  • Animal cruelty issues – The silkworms are killed in the production
  • Needs special care to wash
  • Expensive
  • Can change color from sunlight and perspiration
  • Not durable

Silk

Rayon

is a fiber that is extracted or fabricated from wood pulp. Note: Rayon is considered a semisynthetic fiber.  It comes from wood but in order to make the fibers, it is combined with synthetic materials. Types of rayon include viscose, modal, and lyocell.
Rayon is:

  • Versatile – It can imitate the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton, and linen
  • Easy to dye
  • Soft
  • Smooth
  • Comfortable
  • Highly absorbent
  • Cheap

The disadvantages of rayon are:

  • Bad quality
  • Pills easily
  • Wrinkles
  • Shrinks
  • Loses appearance and shape when wet
  • There are toxic dyes and bleach in the production process
  • Workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used in the production
  • Because it comes from trees, it might contribute to deforestation problems

Bamboo

is a fiber that is extracted or fabricated from natural bamboo. The production is similar to the one of rayon, but instead of using wood pulp, it uses bamboo. This fiber is also considered semisynthetic.
Bamboo is:

  • Anti-static
  • Easy to dye
  • Soft – With a texture similar to silk
  • Breathable and absorbent – It keeps the skin dry and odor free
  • It has the ability to regulate body temperature
  • The production doesn’t need pesticides or fertilizers
  • The plant grows very fast – It regenerates after being cut without the need of replanting (similar to lawn)
  • Biodegradable

The disadvantages of bamboo are:

  • Pills very easy
  • There are toxic chemicals in the production process
  • The fibers absorb a lot of sweat and can encourage microbial growth.

As you can see, all of the fibers have advantages and disadvantages. There is no perfect fiber. But there are fibers less harmful to the environment than others. I hope you find this information useful and it helps you to become more conscious about natural fabrics.

With Love,

Alisson

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Vegan-Friendly​​ Restaurants In Mallorca

Paella, chorizo, serrano ham, octopus, calamari, albondigas… Aside from gazpacho all of the typical Spanish dishes are anything but vegan. The good news is that the vegan community is growing all over the world, also in Mallorca, where you can find tasty and comforting plant-based food. During my stay in the northern part of Mallorca, I found some vegan-friendly places for you. These are my favorites:

Vellaverde

bellaverde-mallorca.png
Picture from Instagram by @theveganstewardess

The whole menu is vegetarian. Most of the dishes are also plant-based available. From starters to salads and desserts you can have a three-course menu in this beautiful restaurant. They have breakfast, lunch, and dinner. To make sure you get a table in this popular place, call beforehand and make a reservation.
Address: Carrer de les Monges, 14, 07470 Pollença, Illes Balears, Spain

La Mar de Vins Artá

La mar de vins Mallorca
Vegan chili with plantain and pico de gallo

This cute little restaurant has mostly vegetarian dishes and a couple of vegan ones. They have a small menu but enough dishes for a good lunch or dinner. They also have vegan-friendly cakes and ecologic coffee. You can order with soy or oat milk.
Address: Carrer d’Antoni Blanes Joan, 34, 07570 Artà, Illes Balears, Spain

Abbaco Natural Food

abbaco-mallorca.jpg
Vegan ramen wok

Located on the boulevard of Pollença, this stylish restaurant sells organic dishes. They have sushi and fish on the menu, but a lot of vegan options as well. If you want to have a complete meal, they offer a three-course vegan menu for €35. They open for lunch and for dinner.
Address: Passeig Saralegui, 110, 07470 Port de Pollença, Illes Balears, Spain

Verdeteja

Verdeteja Mallorca
Picture from Instagram by @verdeteja.alcudia

This little vegetarian organic cafe is located at the heart of Alcudia. It only opens during lunch time. Make sure you go there before 15:00 to enjoy a healthy vegan lunch.
Address: Carrer del Lledoner, 13, 07400 Alcúdia, Illes Balears, Spain

Villa Vegana

villa-vegana-in-mallorca.png
Picture from Instagram by @villavegana

This hotel and restaurant is 100% plant-based. Miriam and Jenz, are the owners and chefs, of this restaurant. They are specialized in making vegan dishes from different countries around the world. Due to the popularity of this place, you need to make a reservation at least two days beforehand.
Address: Cami d´es Pedregar km 2.2, 07313, 07313 Selva, Illes Balears, Spain

Other vegetarian restaurants with vegan options:

Es Ginebro – Avda Bisbe Llompart 124, Inca
L’Exquisit –  Carrer de sa Rectoria, 2, Binissalem
Plaer Vegetaria – Creuers, 1, Manacor (at Av Fra Juniper Serra)
Es Viu Vegeraria I Vins – C/Bisbe Perello 3, Santa Maria

If you stay in the capital you have a lot more options (via happycow.net):

Muy Muy Bueno Deli – Carrer de Tous i Maroto, 5B, floor 1, no. 1
Fal&Feel – Calle Sindicato 33, Palma (at Plaza Mayor)
Bon Lloc – Calle Sant Feliu, 7
Vegan & Raw – Plaza del Bisbe Berenguer de Palou 2
Compost – Carrer Ruben Dario 4
Scoville Palma – Carrer de Manacor, 23
Sabores de Sandra – Carrer Batle Emili Darder, 43
Vip Tapas – C/ Olivera 4
Ziva to go – Plaça Navegació, 11a – Calle Protectora 1 – Carrer Valencia 27

With Love,
Alisson

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OOTD: Halla Halla

Summertime. Who doesn’t love it? The perfect time to go to the beach, relax and sunbath. For this, I was looking for a sustainable swimsuit, and I discovered the Finnish swimwear brand Halla Halla. For their pieces, they use a fabric made from recycled plastic bottles and fishing nets found in the oceans. By this, Halla Halla helps to keep the oceans clean and the marine life to thrive.

All of Halla Halla swimsuit pieces are ethically made in Bali. They keep the production low and only produce a limited quantity at a time. Not only they make their products in an ethical way with sustainable materials, they make them look fun with unique prints and vibrant colors. All of the swimwear is reversible, with on one side a solid color, and on the other side a print. This way you get two looks in one.

On these series of pictures, I am wearing the ‘Coco One Piece Ava’ swimsuit. From one side it has a seashell black and white print and on the other side, it is blue. The pictures were made on Mallorca, Spain.

Recycled Swimwear

‘Let’s look fabulous and feel amazing, while we keep the oceans clean.’ #hallaxhalla

 

 

Econyl Beachwear

 

 

What I´m wearing:
Shirt // Second-hand made from organic cotton
Skirt // Second-hand from a charity shop
Bandana // Vintage shop
Swimsuit // Halla Halla

With Love,
Alisson

Check more sustainable swimwear brands here.

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Fashion Must-have: Little Black Dress

A Little black dress or better known as ‘LBD’ is a black simple and short dress. The origins date back to the 1920s designs of Coco Chanel. The intention was to create a trend that is long-lasting, versatile, and in a neutral color.  An LBD is essential in a woman wardrobe. It can be dressed up or down depending on the occasion. Worn with a jacket and pumps for doing business during the day and wear it with accessories and red lipstick during the night. I am a big fan of this everlasting trend. For me, it’s the perfect solution for when I don’t know what to wear.

Today I listed out my favorite LBD from sustainable brands for you:

1. Beaumont Organic

 

Ethically made in Portugal. It is reversible. This means you can wear it with a round neckline or a V neckline. The dress is made from natural fabrics. 55% linen and 45% organic cotton.

2. Armedangels

Armedangels
Picture from Armedangels’s website

Ethically made in Turkey. Perfect for all the seasons. This dress is made from 100% Lyocell (Tencel®).

3. People Tree

 


A classic dress to have forever.  Made from 95% organic certified cotton and 5% elastane jersey. Ethically made in India by Assisi Garments. Assisi Garments is a social enterprise. The skilled artisans at Assisi transform Fairtrade and organic cotton fibers into beautiful handmade garments.

4. Know The Origin

 


Ethically made in India. This dress is made from 95% organic cotton and 5% elastane. Perfect to wear it with sneakers to go to work. And to wear it with heels for the night.

5. Miss Green

Little Black Dress Ethically made
Picture from Miss Green’s website

Ethically and environmentally responsible made. This dress you can wear with skinny jeans as a long blouse or with ankle boots as a dress. It is made from 100% Tencel.
I hope you get inspired and next time you are looking for a little black dress, you give it a try and look for sustainable brands. If you are out of a budget, try to go to a second-hand shop first, before buying fast fashion brands. There are a lot of ‘old’ clothes ready to have a ‘new’ life.

With Love,

Alisson

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